Resilient Communities and Economies Virtual Oral Abstracts
Dec 02, 2020 02:45 PM - Dec 31, 2020 04:15 PM(America/Chicago)
20201202T1445 20201202T1615 America/Chicago Resilient Communities and Economies (Oral)

This track will encompass natural, anthropogenic and social impacts to coastal hazard resilience and how communities adapt to these impacts. It will encourage a broad range of presentations focusing on state and local efforts to minimize environmental impacts while enhancing economic opportunities and improving resilience to both natural and technological hazards. This track will also include education and outreach efforts to raise awareness and understand climate and hazard challenges. Topics may include land policies; innovative floodplain management strategies; sustainable building design techniques and methodologies; community response and adaptation activities related to climate change, sea level rise and inundation events; and cultural and sociological impacts associated with natural and anthropogenic coastal hazards. Submissions discussing resilience-related topics, including engineering, modeling, tools, remote sensing, field-based experiments, social vulnerability indexing, and other topically-relevant behavioral science are also encouraged.

Virtual 2020 Bays and Bayous Symposium melissa.schneider@usm.edu
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logoMobile Bay National Estuary Program logoMississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium logoThe University of Southern Mississippi  logoDauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation logoAlabama State Port Authority logoMississippi Commercial Fisheries United logoGulf of Mexico Alliance logoHydro, LLC logoGeosyntec  logoNorthern Gulf Institute logoGoodwyn Mills & Cawood, Inc. logoNeel-Schaffer, inc. logoHeadwaters LLC logoStantec Consulting Services Inc. logoDog River Clearwater Revival logoEnvironmental Science Associates (ESA) logoThompson Engineering logo

This track will encompass natural, anthropogenic and social impacts to coastal hazard resilience and how communities adapt to these impacts. It will encourage a broad range of presentations focusing on state and local efforts to minimize environmental impacts while enhancing economic opportunities and improving resilience to both natural and technological hazards. This track will also include education and outreach efforts to raise awareness and understand climate and hazard challenges. Topics may include land policies; innovative floodplain management strategies; sustainable building design techniques and methodologies; community response and adaptation activities related to climate change, sea level rise and inundation events; and cultural and sociological impacts associated with natural and anthropogenic coastal hazards. Submissions discussing resilience-related topics, including engineering, modeling, tools, remote sensing, field-based experiments, social vulnerability indexing, and other topically-relevant behavioral science are also encouraged.

Economic Impacts of Natural Disasters: A Myth or Mis-measurement? View Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 02:45 PM - 03:00 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 20:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:00:00 UTC
This study sheds light on possible spatial aggregation bias and mismeasurement in natural disaster impacts on economic growth when adopting the synthetic control method. Using the impacted U.S. areas of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 as a case study, we compared trends of real GRDP per capita, population, and GRDP at New Orleans-Metairie metropolitan statistical area and Louisiana State, 1992 - 2017. This study empirically demonstrates that improper spatial units of analysis could distort the causal inference in the synthetic control method. Additionally, per capita growth as indicators of recovery from natural disasters is likely to misinterpret economic growth when affected regions experience a sharp decrease in population. These biased results arouse special attention to possible underestimation of natural disaster impacts, particularly when analyzing economically lagging regions. Also, seemingly increasing per capita indicators do not always support evidence of creative destruction after natural disasters.
Presenters Seong Yun
Mississippi State Univeristy
Co-authors
AK
Ayoung Kim
Mississippi State University
Local Storytelling for Climate Resilience View Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 03:00 PM - 03:15 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 21:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:15:00 UTC
The Sarasota-Manatee region is one of the most vulnerable areas in the United States to impacts from sea level rise and coastal flooding. A group of local environmental and science organizations were surveyed in 2018 to determine the extent of existing resources for climate change education and outreach to use with their guests and employees. This survey also asked respondents to identify gaps in available resources and for feedback about the content of any new materials. Based on the survey responses, the City applied for the Gulf of Mexico Climate and Resilience Community of Practice grant to create four professionally produced short videos of diverse community members telling stories about experiencing climate impacts and implementing adaptation or mitigation solutions. A steering committee identified the human-interest stories and included strong Sarasota imagery to increase relate-ability and utilize best practices for behavior change. Interviewees included: a rancher whose family has worked Sarasota County land for generations, a vegetable farmer discussing seasonality changes, a barrier island resident discussing sunny day flooding, members of Sarasota’s historic African American neighborhood discussing flooding, and local coaches and a doctor describing heat impacts on student athletes. These stories allowed entry points to present unified climate projections and actionable solutions through local storytelling and will be shared on public access channels and across over 30 local organizations. The second portion of the grant project was to create digital and print resources to expand upon the videos. This presentation will discuss the thought process that went into producing these local stories, the impacts to-date, and lessons learned.
Presenters Stevie Freeman-Montes
City Of Sarasota
Prichard Rain Barrel ProgramView Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 03:15 PM - 03:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 21:15:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:30:00 UTC
The Mobile Bay National Estuary Program is currently implementing a Low Impact Development (LID) stormwater management project with the installation of low-cost rainwater harvest systems in the Toulmins Spring Branch Watershed (TSB), a sub-watershed in the greater Three Mile Creek Watershed (TMC). This subwatershed is highly urbanized and was first placed on the State’s impaired waters list for pathogens in 2004, with the primary source of impairment identified as stormwater runoff and failing sanitary sewer infrastructure. The TMC Watershed Management Plan (2014) recommended implementation of LID practices to reduce stormwater impacts in the TSB area. The 2016 Prichard Drainage Study was commissioned to investigate issues related to urban flooding and nonpoint source pollution. The study identified and mapped areas with recurring urban flooding and sanitary sewer overflows. Identified hot spots became target areas for this Prichard Rain Barrel Program. The purpose of this project is to improve the quality of receiving waters in TSB. Goals include reducing volumes and velocities of stormwater runoff carrying nonpointsource pollution and causing sanitary sewer overflows, and providing a free, alternate source of water to an underserved community paying significantly higher rates for water than surrounding communities. Objectives include installing as many rainwater harvest systems in the headwaters of an urban community draining to the impaired waterway as possible, and educating community members about impacts of polluted stormwater runoff. The program, initially implemented by Coastal Alabama Conservation Corps members in 2017, was reestablished in January 2019 with private sector partners. Sixty rainwater harvest systems have been installed for low-to-moderate-income homeowners, with 18 installed in 2017 and 42 installed since reestablishing the program in 2019. Each installation includes two 55-gallon barrels (donated by Greif Inc.) and is capable of a 110-gallon reduction in stormwaterRunoff per rain event per residence.
Presenters
MB
Madison Blanchard
Mobile Bay National Estuary Program
Considering Sea-Level Rise in Long-Term Infrastructure Planning – What is it worth?View Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 03:30 PM - 03:45 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 21:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:45:00 UTC
Sea-level rise (SLR) is negatively impacting coastal infrastructure such as reducing the effectiveness of stormwater systems, jeopardizing key aspects of fresh and wastewater systems, and flooding roads more frequently. Adapting to these challenges can take on a variety of formats depending on the specific needs of the systems and the people they serve. To understand the benefits of planning for long-term flood risks as sea levels rise, we examined the costs associated with long-term flood protection around a planned new water reclamation facility in Jackson County. We leveraged a recently released tool, the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Economics Decision Guide Software (EDGe$), that is designed specifically to facilitate considering the costs and benefits of taking resilient action. Together, we worked through the various inputs for costs, the potential losses that would be sustained during a flood by the Jackson County Utility Authority, and potential losses that would be sustained by the broader community if the new facility were to be flooded. Through this effort many things about the process were identified that could inform future efforts including key assumptions, regulatory requirements in cost-benefit analyses, and challenges in considering changing flood risk over time. The results of this specific cost-benefit analysis will be presented. Additionally, we will share lessons learned from the process and recommendations for similar efforts in the future.
Presenters Camille Sicangco
Mississippi State University, Coastal Research And Extension Center
Co-authors Renee Collini
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium/Mississippi State University
JH
Jennifer F. Helgeson
National Institute Of Standards And Technology
CG
Chase Glisson
Jackson County Utility Authority
EP
Eric Page
Jackson County Utility Authority
MP
Morgan Pitts
Jackson County Utility Authority
Underrepresented and Underserved Community Engagement and Enhanced Risk Communication Understanding along the East Coast, Gulf Coast and HawaiiView Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 03:45 PM - 04:00 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 21:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 22:00:00 UTC
Sea level rise poses a great threat to coastal areas and our way of life. As flooding increases in frequency and intensity across the country, vulnerable populations become a target to its impacts. Hawaii, the Carolinas, and the Northern Gulf coasts are among the regions experiencing significant consequences from coastal flooding derived from chronic sea level rise. The U.S. dedicates much research to risk communication and climate change adaptation strategies; however, these coastal areas are home to a large percentage of underserved and underrepresented communities that can be challenging to meaningfully engage. The impacts of short-term rise combined with long-term rise will not only cause flooding, erosion, and intrusion of saltwater into freshwater resources but also, increased financial consequences such as higher poverty levels that damage livelihoods and coastal resources. There is a growing need to better understand how to effectively serve and communicate with these stakeholders and develop culturally-relevant and targeted resources to reach these communities. This work encompasses a synthesis of existing research in risk perception, behavior, and communication in five different communities in Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Hawaii. It also provides an overview of best risk communication practices with underserved and underrepresented communities’, barriers to risk communication, and the types of information needed to achieve meaningful engagement. Overall recommendations call for the use of bottom-top approaches that put community’s needs first, partnerships with community organizations, community empowerment, and the use of a holistic and systematic way that integrates scientific science and people’s needs and opinions.
Presenters Karla Lopez
University Of Texas At El Paso
Mississippi State Univeristy
City of Sarasota
Mobile Bay National Estuary Program
Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center
University of Texas at El Paso
No moderator for this session!
SC Sea Grant Consortium
Dr. Jessica Lunt
Dauphin Island Sea Lab
American Meteorological Society
Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts
+38 more attendees. View All
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