Resilient Communities and Economies Virtual Oral Abstracts
Dec 02, 2020 11:45 AM - Dec 31, 2020 01:15 PM(America/Chicago)
20201202T1145 20201202T1315 America/Chicago Resilient Communities and Economies - Debris (Oral)

This track will encompass natural, anthropogenic and social impacts to coastal hazard resilience and how communities adapt to these impacts. It will encourage a broad range of presentations focusing on state and local efforts to minimize environmental impacts while enhancing economic opportunities and improving resilience to both natural and technological hazards. This track will also include education and outreach efforts to raise awareness and understand climate and hazard challenges. Topics may include land policies; innovative floodplain management strategies; sustainable building design techniques and methodologies; community response and adaptation activities related to climate change, sea level rise and inundation events; and cultural and sociological impacts associated with natural and anthropogenic coastal hazards. Submissions discussing resilience-related topics, including engineering, modeling, tools, remote sensing, field-based experiments, social vulnerability indexing, and other topically-relevant behavioral science are also encouraged.

Virtual 2020 Bays and Bayous Symposium melissa.schneider@usm.edu
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logoMobile Bay National Estuary Program logoMississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium logoThe University of Southern Mississippi  logoDauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation logoAlabama State Port Authority logoMississippi Commercial Fisheries United logoGulf of Mexico Alliance logoHydro, LLC logoGeosyntec  logoNorthern Gulf Institute logoGoodwyn Mills & Cawood, Inc. logoNeel-Schaffer, inc. logoHeadwaters LLC logoStantec Consulting Services Inc. logoDog River Clearwater Revival logoEnvironmental Science Associates (ESA) logoThompson Engineering logo

This track will encompass natural, anthropogenic and social impacts to coastal hazard resilience and how communities adapt to these impacts. It will encourage a broad range of presentations focusing on state and local efforts to minimize environmental impacts while enhancing economic opportunities and improving resilience to both natural and technological hazards. This track will also include education and outreach efforts to raise awareness and understand climate and hazard challenges. Topics may include land policies; innovative floodplain management strategies; sustainable building design techniques and methodologies; community response and adaptation activities related to climate change, sea level rise and inundation events; and cultural and sociological impacts associated with natural and anthropogenic coastal hazards. Submissions discussing resilience-related topics, including engineering, modeling, tools, remote sensing, field-based experiments, social vulnerability indexing, and other topically-relevant behavioral science are also encouraged.

Whose debris is it anyway? Emergency Response to Marine DebrisView Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 11:45 AM - 12:00 Noon (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 17:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 18:00:00 UTC
Both natural and man-made disasters can lead to large amounts of debris along shorelines and in coastal waters. Unlike response to debris on land, determining jurisdiction and authority for marine debris removal can be complicated, funds may not be available, and debris may be left in place. Through a highly collaborative process, NOAA's Marine Debris Program is developing marine debris emergency response guides for coastal states, and has published response guides for all five Gulf states including Mississippi and Alabama. These documents serve as a complete reference for marine debris response after disasters—with an emphasis on incidents affecting the coastal zone. The document outlines existing response structures at the local, state, and federal levels to facilitate a coordinated, well-managed, and immediate response to marine debris after disasters. This work has shed light on existing gaps and challenges associated with response to disaster debris and has helped clarify key agency roles.
Presenters Amy Gohres
Genwest/NOAA
Co-authors
CW
Caitlin Wessel
NOAA Marine Debris Program
Spreading awareness and promoting marine debris prevention through extension programsView Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 12:00 Noon - 12:15 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 18:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 18:15:00 UTC
Marine debris constitutes as any persistent solid material that is manufactured or processed and, directly or indirectly, disposed of or abandoned in the marine environment. The presence of marine debris has been shown to have significant environmental and economic impacts. Unfortunately, the quantity of marine debris is increasing at accelerating rates due to increased production of single-use items and poor stewardship practices. To address these issues, a team of coastal Extension specialists leveraged the long-standing annual Mississippi Coastal Cleanup event to form the Mississippi Coastal Cleanup Program (MSCCP) in 2016. The mission of the MSCCP is preventing and removing litter from the coastal environment through education, outreach, research, and cleanup events. During cleanup events, thousands of citizen scientists collect marine debris data that is then used to inform decision making and the development of outreach programs. In 2019 alone, over 8,500 citizen scientists removed and categorized over 17.8 tons of marine debris from coastal Mississippi. Plastic items made up over 77% of the collected marine debris by count. This locally relevant information is utilized to create marine debris-focused outreach materials that are distributed through a variety of methods, including social media and direct presentations. Feedback gathered during outreach events has led to several additional activities and materials for the program in 2020 and beyond. These activities include the addition of a July 5th Star-Spangled cleanup, monthly cleanups at peer-suggested sites, as well as the creation of the Mississippi Inland Cleanup Program (MSICP). This new program will extend the cleanup efforts inland to serve a total of twenty-one counties across the southeastern region of Mississippi by promoting trash-free education and additional cleanup events.
Presenters Jessi James
Mississippi Inland Cleanup Program
Co-authors
ES
Eric Sparks
Mississippi State University And Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
PERCEIVED ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF MARINE DEBRIS ON MISSISSIPPI COMMERCIAL SHRIMPING View Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 12:15 PM - 12:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 18:15:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 18:30:00 UTC
The reduction of marine debris in the commercial fishery enhances economic opportunities in coastal fishing counties. This economic analysis assessed the perceived economic impacts of marine debris on commercial fishing among Mississippi commercial shrimpers. The perceived economic impacts of marine debris on commercial fishing were assessed using an end-of-the-year survey of captains or owners of commercial shrimping vessels/boats registered in Mississippi. The one-time survey was conducted in December 2018. The perceived impacts, types of marine debris caught, and associated damages were compared by fishermen and vessel characteristics, county location, type of shrimping gear, and fishing efforts. Chi-square tests and regression results showed little or no significant differences in the perceived impacts, types of marine debris caught and associated damages to commercial shrimping operations who participated in the 2018 preliminary survey.
Presenters BENEDICT POSADAS
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
Co-authors
ES
Eric Sparks
Mississippi State University And Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
AR
Alyssa Rodolfich
Mississippi State University
SC
Sarah Cunningham
Mississippi State University
The Distribution and Direct Economic Impacts of Marine Debris on the Mississippi Commercial Shrimping IndustryView Abstract Watch Recording
Oral Presentation 12:30 PM - 12:45 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 18:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 18:45:00 UTC
Commercial shrimpers in the Mississippi Sound frequently encounter marine debris in their nets, resulting in the loss of time and catch, and added repair costs. However, there is no formal reporting procedure in place for reporting these interactions and, thus, little data exists on the types, abundances, or economic impact of marine debris in the Mississippi Sound. Prior to this study, no information existed on the spatial and temporal distribution of marine debris that shrimpers encounter within Mississippi Sound and the subsequent economic impact on commercial shrimping. Collection and dissemination of this information will help improve our understanding of the potential impacts of marine debris and implementation of preventive measures. Data collection leveraged an EPA project that incentivizes commercial shrimpers to remove the marine debris they encounter while shrimping while also collecting data about it. To characterize the quantity and impacts of marine debris, a sample of commercial shrimpers (20) were selected for a comprehensive data collection program. These participants are required to maintain a logbook for every marine debris encounter over the shrimping season, July 2020 through December 2020 , and use a GPS enabled camera to photograph every marine debris encounter. The logbook will contain information on time spent fishing, types of marine debris encountered, and lost fishing time due to damaged gear. These data are being used to generate maps of the spatial and temporal distribution of marine debris in the MS Sound using ArcPro while the total economic impacts of marine debris are measured using IMPLAN software.
Presenters
AR
Alyssa Rodolfich
Mississippi State Coastal Research And Extension Center
Co-authors
ES
Eric Sparks
Mississippi State University And Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
BENEDICT POSADAS
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
CW
Caitlin Wessel
NOAA Marine Debris Program
Ryan Bradley
Mississippi Commercial Fisheries United
Mississippi State Coastal Research and Extension Center
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
Mississippi Inland Cleanup Program
Genwest/NOAA
No moderator for this session!
Dr. Jessica Lunt
Dauphin Island Sea Lab
Ms. Bethany Hudson
Mobile Bay National Estuary Program
 Mandy Sartain
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
Mississippi State University and Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
 Sonia Vedral
Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative
+39 more attendees. View All

Notes

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