Healthy Coastal Ecosystems Virtual 3-Minute Lightning Talk
Dec 02, 2020 04:30 PM - Dec 31, 2020 05:30 PM(America/Chicago)
20201202T1630 20201202T1730 America/Chicago Lightning Talks - Resilient Communities and Economies

This track will encompass natural, anthropogenic and social impacts to coastal hazard resilience and how communities adapt to these impacts. It will encourage a broad range of presentations focusing on state and local efforts to minimize environmental impacts while enhancing economic opportunities and improving resilience to both natural and technological hazards. This track will also include education and outreach efforts to raise awareness and understand climate and hazard challenges. Topics may include land policies; innovative floodplain management strategies; sustainable building design techniques and methodologies; community response and adaptation activities related to climate change, sea level rise and inundation events; and cultural and sociological impacts associated with natural and anthropogenic coastal hazards. Submissions discussing resilience-related topics, including engineering, modeling, tools, remote sensing, field-based experiments, social vulnerability indexing, and other topically-relevant behavioral science are also encouraged.

Virtual 2020 Bays and Bayous Symposium melissa.schneider@usm.edu
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logoMobile Bay National Estuary Program logoMississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium logoThe University of Southern Mississippi  logoDauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation logoAlabama State Port Authority logoMississippi Commercial Fisheries United logoGulf of Mexico Alliance logoHydro, LLC logoGeosyntec  logoNorthern Gulf Institute logoGoodwyn Mills & Cawood, Inc. logoNeel-Schaffer, inc. logoHeadwaters LLC logoStantec Consulting Services Inc. logoDog River Clearwater Revival logoEnvironmental Science Associates (ESA) logoThompson Engineering logo

This track will encompass natural, anthropogenic and social impacts to coastal hazard resilience and how communities adapt to these impacts. It will encourage a broad range of presentations focusing on state and local efforts to minimize environmental impacts while enhancing economic opportunities and improving resilience to both natural and technological hazards. This track will also include education and outreach efforts to raise awareness and understand climate and hazard challenges. Topics may include land policies; innovative floodplain management strategies; sustainable building design techniques and methodologies; community response and adaptation activities related to climate change, sea level rise and inundation events; and cultural and sociological impacts associated with natural and anthropogenic coastal hazards. Submissions discussing resilience-related topics, including engineering, modeling, tools, remote sensing, field-based experiments, social vulnerability indexing, and other topically-relevant behavioral science are also encouraged.

Sea-Level Rise in the Classroom: Connecting Science and Social Studies to Foster Science-to-Civics LiteracyView Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 22:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:30:00 UTC
Coastal flooding and sea-level rise coupled with socioeconomic vulnerability is exacerbating hazards along our coast making it imperative for coastal residents to understand the risks and need for proactive solutions. Sea-Level Rise in the Classroom is a curriculum developed through the collaboration of researchers and educators from the northern Gulf of Mexico. The curriculum enhances scientific, environmental, and civics literacy skills and capabilities of high school students through lessons on understanding and addressing sea-level rise impacts. It is imperative students understand the risks and potential solutions to sea-level rise. This is achieved through four modules that introduce sea-level rise and flooding basics and highlight pathways towards resilience through natural/nature based and policy/ordinance solutions and community planning. Following a cross-curricula approach, the lessons incorporate state and national standards in science and social studies. Curriculum material connects classroom concepts to local examples of resilience through recommended field-experiences and resilience professional guest speakers. This lightning session will highlight the components of the curriculum including an overview of the module lessons and capstone project.
Presenters Sonia Vedral
Northern Gulf Of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative
A Snapshot of NOAA in the Gulf of Mexico RegionView Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 22:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:30:00 UTC
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) does work that affects more than one-third of America’s gross domestic product, and provides information that helps people make decisions related to topics ranging from weather to coastal restoration to fisheries. We develop tools and information to advance coastal community resiliency, and we chart navigable waters, track tides and currents, and provide training for and respond to major events like oil spills. We forecast weather and water conditions around the country and provide related services to support decision making and help protect lives and property. We collect, archive, and provide vast amounts of data from satellites, buoys, drifters, and a variety of other platforms. We conduct cutting edge applied research on the ocean and atmosphere, and are looking at ways that emerging technologies and fields connect to that research. We have labs and offices that focus on sustainable fisheries, protected resources, and habitat conservation and restoration. Our ships and aircraft collect data around the country and world, and some of the planes even fly through hurricanes. All of these things that NOAA does are represented in the Gulf of Mexico region, and all are done better thanks to partnerships with a wide array of organizations that connect with NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Ocean Service (NOS), National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS), Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (OMAO), and the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR).
Presenters Kristen Laursen
National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration
Gulf TREE: Your Ultimate Climate Resilience Tool GuideView Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 22:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:30:00 UTC
Gulf TREE is a filter-based search engine designed to match users with relevant climate resilience tools quickly, easily, and confidently. It does this by sorting through the over-100 tools relevant to the Gulf of Mexico and matching users with one that meets their criteria. The web resource, released February 2018, was created by the Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative, Gulf of Mexico Alliance, and the Gulf of Mexico Climate and Resilience Community of Practice. Gulf TREE is continuously maintained by adding new tools, retiring old tools, and updating current tools. Gulf TREE is relevant for users of all experience levels and across a wide variety of climate-relevant sectors, such as natural resource management, community planning, restoration, and many more. Input from nearly 200 prospective end-users across the climate resilience spectrum was sought to understand what specific issues stakeholders are tackling, questions and needs for tool suitability, and to ensure an intuitive, user-friendly website. The result is a powerful and capable resource for Gulf of Mexico stakeholders and a solution to common obstacles faced by stakeholders interested in climate resilience. In this lightning talk, Gulf TREE will be explained, a mini-tutorial will be performed, and the upcoming Train the Trainer workshops will be highlighted for further information. Feel free to explore the site at www.GulfTREE.org.
Presenters Mikaela Heming
MS-AL Sea Grant; Mississippi State University
Co-authors Renee Collini
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium/Mississippi State University
Plan for It!: A Serious Game Supporting Coastal Planning Decisions View Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 22:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:30:00 UTC
Have you ever been asked to participate in an outreach event about resilience but were at a loss for an activity for the general public? Are the planners and floodplain managers in the municipalities you serve constantly under fire for the actions they put in place? Does the general public in your area need a better understanding of resilience decisions? Never fear! There’s a new game here to help. Being a town planner isn’t easy. Planners try to balance what is best for individuals with what is best for the environment and town overall. Coastal planners have added layers, being tasked with ensuring measures are in place so the town is the most resilient it can be during and after hurricanes. Plan for It! puts the player in the role of the planner of a small coastal community, asking them to make real life resilience decisions in risk/reward scenarios to better prepare their town for the upcoming storm season. Following playing this short game (5 minutes or less), players have a better understanding of the role of resilience measures and the trade-offs in the planning process. Plan for It! is appropriate for players as young as 6th grade but holds the interest of older children and adults as well. Being a stand-alone computer-based game, internet access is not necessary, so it can be utilized in any outreach or education setting. This lightening session will demonstrate game play and detail the concepts behind development.
Presenters Jody Thompson
AUMERC/MASGC
Is a FORTIFIED Home a Good Investment?View Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 22:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:30:00 UTC
We estimate the effect on sales price of a FORTIFIED Home designation for residential properties in two coastal Alabama counties. Our empirical strategy is to approximate an experiment using matching and hedonic regression with a rich set of property characteristics to develop a reasonable counterfactual. Our data, which span the years 2012-2019, come from three sources: property transaction and characteristics data come from the Zillow Transaction and Assessment Dataset (ZTRAX) ; FORTIFIED Homes designations come from the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS); and digital flood zone data come from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL). We find that a FORTIFIED Gold designation increases the mean sales price of newly-constructed homes by up to 8%. We find no significant price effect of FORTIFIED Gold designation on existing homes, and find no significant price effect of FORTIFIED Roof/Bronze designation. Nevertheless, our benefit-cost analysis indicates that a FORTIFIED designation can result in a net gain for some homeowners when insurance discounts and avoided damages are accounted for.
Presenters Dan Petrolia
Mississippi State University
Co-authors
SG
Shea Gould
Mississippi State University
Seong Yun
Mississippi State Univeristy
JC
J. Reid Cummings
University Of South Alabama
JM
Josh Maples
Mississippi State University
Augmented Reality (AR) for Coastal Flooding Visualization View Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 22:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:30:00 UTC
Advances in geospatial technologies have stream-lined data collection, analysis, and visualization for environmental and coastal resource management. These advances have helped to enhance geospatial education and outreach application development for issues related to coastal flooding and sea level rise. Augmented Reality (AR) technologies are allowing real-time interactions with geospatial data through mobile devices that enhances what is typically seen in web and desktop applications. Augmented reality technologies provide the capability to overlay simulated geo-referenced data to the real world with a mobile device’s integrated camera. The current efforts of this project are coupling augmented reality and geospatial technologies to allow users to visualize simulated coastal flooding. A simplistic linear superposition (or “bathtub”) model is currently being used to simulate the flooding on the landscape and is built on QL2 lidar collected in 2015. The augmented reality application allows the user to increase and decrease simulated inundation levels on the actual landscape as they navigate the area through the camera on their mobile device. Future project efforts are focused on improving the model for specific areas of the landscape with high-resolution lidar collected with unmanned aerial systems and enhanced three-dimensional (3D) structures. This application will provide improved education, decision-making, and management of coastal resources and how they may be impacted by flooding and seal level rise.
Presenters John Cartwright
Mississippi State Univeristy
Co-authors
JV
John Van Der Zwaag
Mississippi State University
Using Green Infrastructure Planning to Increase Resiliency and EngagementView Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/02 22:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:30:00 UTC
Urban areas in coastal communities have adopted “green infrastructure” plans and strategies to increase community resiliency, and conserve and protect their natural resources such as greenways, wetlands, and open spaces. This community-based research identified: 1) nine (9) cities that utilized green infrastructure planning in the Mississippi-Alabama coastal region; 2) best practices among those cities; 3) landscape patterns to be protected; and 4) developed a partnership plan to involve governmental leaders as engaged learners. This research used both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine green infrastructure planning practices and outcomes in the Mississippi-Alabama coastal region. Faculty and student researchers engaged and assessed the coastal cities in green infrastructure planning strategies using a planning quality scorecard of key indicators, an online survey, interviews and landscape spatial pattern analysis. A regional partnership plan encouraged municipalities to actively interact with each other on a local level to transfer their shared knowledge to other coastal communities. Research findings, community engagement methods and impacts, student successes, and lessons learned are shared.
Presenters Charlene LeBleu
Auburn University
Co-authors
MH
Megan Heim-LaFrombois
Auburn University
SB
Sweta Byahut
Auburn University
SR
Stephanie Rogers
Auburn University
Northern Gulf of Mexico Sentinel Site Cooperative
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
MS-AL Sea Grant; Mississippi State University
AUMERC/MASGC
Mississippi State University
+ 2 more speakers. View All
No moderator for this session!
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 Melissa Schneider
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium
Mr. Stephen  Deal
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium
Mississippi State University/Northern Gulf Institute
 Renee Collini
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium/Mississippi State University
+19 more attendees. View All
Program Navigator