Disasters and Disruptions Virtual 3-Minute Lightning Talk
Dec 01, 2020 04:00 PM - Dec 31, 2020 05:00 PM(America/Chicago)
20201201T1600 20201201T1700 America/Chicago Lightning Talks - Disasters and Disruptions

The Gulf Coast has experienced - and is experiencing - a variety of disasters and disruptions from the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster (this year being the 10th anniversary), major hurricanes, freshwater inflow events, such as the opening of the Bonnet Carré Spillway and the ongoing COVID-19 health pandemic. For some of these disasters and disruptions, we have a better understanding of human and ecological recovery, with restoration efforts underway or planned to advance recovery. For others, our knowledge of the impacts and the recovery process is more limited. Topics in this track may include new research, perspectives and/or updates on human and ecological impacts, restoration, extension and education and outreach-related discoveries related to these and other major disruptions and disasters affecting the Gulf Coast.

Virtual 2020 Bays and Bayous Symposium melissa.schneider@usm.edu
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logoMobile Bay National Estuary Program logoMississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium logoThe University of Southern Mississippi  logoDauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation logoAlabama State Port Authority logoMississippi Commercial Fisheries United logoGulf of Mexico Alliance logoHydro, LLC logoGeosyntec  logoNorthern Gulf Institute logoGoodwyn Mills & Cawood, Inc. logoNeel-Schaffer, inc. logoHeadwaters LLC logoStantec Consulting Services Inc. logoDog River Clearwater Revival logoEnvironmental Science Associates (ESA) logoThompson Engineering logo

The Gulf Coast has experienced - and is experiencing - a variety of disasters and disruptions from the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster (this year being the 10th anniversary), major hurricanes, freshwater inflow events, such as the opening of the Bonnet Carré Spillway and the ongoing COVID-19 health pandemic. For some of these disasters and disruptions, we have a better understanding of human and ecological recovery, with restoration efforts underway or planned to advance recovery. For others, our knowledge of the impacts and the recovery process is more limited. Topics in this track may include new research, perspectives and/or updates on human and ecological impacts, restoration, extension and education and outreach-related discoveries related to these and other major disruptions and disasters affecting the Gulf Coast.

The Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Coastal Science Fellowship for Minority Undergraduates View Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC
In 2020, the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium offered a Coastal Science Fellowship for Minority Undergraduates for the first time in an effort to broaden diversity in coastal sciences in the region. Fellows were recruited from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in MS and AL to participate in a 10 week program. Each selected fellow received a stipend and allowance for room and board. Program mentors were recruited from across the MS-AL Sea Grant Consortium and received a stipend to support Fellow activities. Ms Remeya Ganesh from Mississippi Valley State (MS) and Ms. Shardeja English from Tuskegee University (AL) served as Fellows in 2020. Both were rising seniors. Ms. English was mentored by Dr. Eric Sparks and his team at the Mississippi State Coastal Research and Extension Center. Despite the COVID pandemic, Shardeja was able to work onsite and conducted a variety of field work including work on living shorelines, microplastics, and habitat restoration. Shardeja gained confidence and valuable experience in group work as well as insight into the graduate school application process. Ms Ganesh was mentored by Dr. Tina Miller-Way and the Discovery Hall Programs team at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL). Due to the pandemic and consequent delayed opening of summer programs at DISL, Remeya started her Fellowship working virtually on coastal science curricula but was onsite at DISL for the last month of the fellowship assisting in summer camp programs and outreach efforts. Remeya credits the program with helping her to teach effectively as well as learning about Gulf coast marine life. Despite their interest in health sciences careers, both felt they learned a great deal during the experience and that the Fellowship was valuable to their professional development. MASGC’s Coastal Science Fellowship for Minority Undergraduates will be offered again in 2021.
Presenters Tina Miller-Way
Dauphin Island Sea Lab
Co-authors
ES
Eric Sparks
Mississippi State University And Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
SE
Shardeja English
Tuskegee University
RG
Remeya Ganesh
Mississippi Valley State University
Facilitating Resource Management in Unprecedented Times: Lessons from the Gulf CoastView Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC
Almost overnight, the COVID-19 pandemic presented a host of new challenges for conducting business as usual for natural and cultural resource managers. As organizations strive to accomplish tasks in this time of uncertainty, most have had to turn to technological solutions for safely convening groups of people to share knowledge and deliberate decisions. Assembling subject-matter experts and stakeholders to participate in structured, interactive workshops to assist resource managers in their work has been a common approach in contemporary resource management. Can this technique effectively make the leap to the virtual world? What are some best practices meeting organizers can implement to replicate the most important features of in-person workshops and accomplish their goals? Lessons learned from a recent series of facilitated interagency meetings to discuss sediment management information needs for Gulf Islands National Seashore will be shared for the benefit of others who may be grappling with how to proceed with their own meetings using virtual platforms. Using this real-life illustration, the meeting’s organizers will offer their insights into effective tactics and strategies for all phases of workshop planning and execution. Numerous tips will be shared that are useful for any facilitated meeting, but planning considerations for successful virtual meetings will be emphasized. While virtual meetings are not ideal for some situations, with time and attention, many agendas can make the leap so that managers can meaningfully engage partners in their work.
Presenters Kelly Samek
National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration
Co-authors
CY
Caitlin Young
NOAA RESTORE Science Program
ES
Erin Seekamp
North Carolina State University
The Art of Marine Science Exploring Oysters at Virtual Summer Camp View Abstract Watch Recording
3-Minute Lightning Talk 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM (America/Chicago) 2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC
The University of Southern Mississippi Marine Education Center and the Walter Anderson Museum of Art teamed up to offer summer camp online during the pandemic. The camp was a pilot project to explore compelling ways of delivering art and science virtually. The partners chose the oyster as the topic. Each day the team linked one hour of online oyster science to one hour of interactive art with an hour offline spent in individual reflection and journaling. Content included oyster aquaculture, water quality, the oyster's history, and the geometric beauty of diatoms. The group faced several challenges, including attracting participants in a sea of virtual opportunities and keeping them engaged for three hours during each of the five days, with the expectation that they would work on their own during lunch and re-engage in the afternoon ready for art. It was a challenge to create rich, topic-specific, outdoor learning experiences. Producing them virtually on the water, subject to weather and connectivity issues, added complexity. Partners employed a variety of strategies to address challenges. They offered pre-registered participants a curated box of science materials and art supplies for the cost of shipping. This incentive, coupled with previous educational achievement of both partners, resulted in filling all twenty-five seats within 48 hours. Scheduling interactive art education in the afternoon encouraged all participants to return for the afternoon session. The team kept content delivery fast-paced, using tools that included presentations, virtual field experiences, demonstrations, and guests. In the morning, each day had a different educator present some aspects of oyster science. The afternoon featured a consistent art educator guiding students through the creation of outstanding art projects. By the end of the week, the educators and students were a cohesive, engaged group, and nobody wanted the week to end.
Presenters Anita Arguelles
USM Marine Education Center
Dauphin Island Sea Lab
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
USM Marine Education Center
No moderator for this session!
Ms. Rayne Palmer
Auburn University, Alabama Cooperative Extension, MS-AL Sea Grant
Dr. Shannon Martin
University of Miami - CIMAS
Dr. Laura Blackmon
USM Marine Education Center
U.S. Department of Commerce/ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Mississippi State University
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