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Virtual Oral Abstracts Living Marine Resources
Dec 02, 2020 02:45 PM - Dec 31, 2020 04:15 PM (America/Chicago) Switch to local time
20201202T1445 20201202T1615 America/Chicago Living Marine Resources - Fisheries Management (Oral)

Although subject to long-term fluctuations and episodic anthropogenic impacts, the northern Gulf of Mexico continues to support a diversity of productive fisheries and sustain flora and fauna that are of interest to conservationists. This track will focus on the applied ecology of living resources in the Gulf of Mexico. A major challenge of working toward sustainability in this region is to balance the interests of stakeholders while continuing to develop data, models and management policies that result in long-term benefits. Potential presentation topics include research that addresses management questions necessary for sustainability of the Gulf of Mexico ranging from single species to entire ecosystems. Ecological studies help us understand the results of different management decisions and restoration activities, especially as we evaluate the consequences of natural and human-caused changes and changes to management and conservation strategies. Potential presentations for this track will allow the research community, private sector, community action groups, resource managers and NGOs to share knowledge with coastal decision-makers and increase dialogue among these groups.

Virtual 2020 Bays and Bayous Symposium melissa.schneider@usm.edu
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logoMobile Bay National Estuary Program logoMississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium logoThe University of Southern Mississippi  logoDauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation logoAlabama State Port Authority logoMississippi Commercial Fisheries United logoGulf of Mexico Alliance logoHydro, LLC logoGeosyntec  logoNorthern Gulf Institute logoGoodwyn Mills & Cawood, Inc. logoNeel-Schaffer, inc. logoHeadwaters LLC logoStantec Consulting Services Inc. logoDog River Clearwater Revival logoEnvironmental Science Associates (ESA) logoThompson Engineering logo

Although subject to long-term fluctuations and episodic anthropogenic impacts, the northern Gulf of Mexico continues to support a diversity of productive fisheries and sustain flora and fauna that are of interest to conservationists. This track will focus on the applied ecology of living resources in the Gulf of Mexico. A major challenge of working toward sustainability in this region is to balance the interests of stakeholders while continuing to develop data, models and management policies that result in long-term benefits. Potential presentation topics include research that addresses management questions necessary for sustainability of the Gulf of Mexico ranging from single species to entire ecosystems. Ecological studies help us understand the results of different management decisions and restoration activities, especially as we evaluate the consequences of natural and human-caused changes and changes to management and conservation strategies. Potential presentations for this track will allow the research community, private sector, community action groups, resource managers and NGOs to share knowledge with coastal decision-makers and increase dialogue among these groups.

Commercial Shrimper Engagement in Derelict Crab Trap Removal Program: Implications for Future Program Management View Abstract
02:45 PM - 03:00 PM2020/12/02 20:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:00:00 UTC
Ghost fishing is a term used to describe abandoned and lost fishing gear that catches marine life. One common type of derelict fishing gear in Mississippi Sound are Blue Crab traps. Derelict crab traps are the result of a combination of factors, but not limited to frequent storms, boat traffic, vandalism, deterioration, and negligent trap owners. Accumlation of derelict crab traps has negative impacts on the ecosystem and the fishing industry. Crab traps tend to accumulate marine life over long periods of time due to feedback loops of marine life getting trapped and baiting in other marine life. In the fishing industry, commercial shrimpers may catch derelict crab traps in their trawls causing holes, lost time, and lower catch yields resulting in negative monetary impacts. Historically, traps caught by commercial shrimpers have been discarded back into the water causing further issues. In 2019 and through funding from the EPA Gulf of Mexico Program, the Mississippi State University Extension Center partnered with Mississippi Commercial Fisheries United, Mississippi Coalition for Vietnamese-American Fisher Folks and Families, and the NOAA Marine Debris Program to develop a derelict crab trap incentive program. Commercial shrimpers with valid licensing can sign up and will receive a $5 per trap incentive for every trap that is brought inshore and placed at one of four collection sites along the Mississippi Coast. They are also required to turn in a data card showing the location of each caught trap. The goal of this program is to create a healthier, safer, and more profitable Mississippi Sound. This program collected 1,294 traps in 2019 and approximately 500 traps to date in 2020. The prevalence of derelict traps appears to be decreasing in Mississippi Sound. The results indicate that this program may be more cost effective on a biannual or triennial basis.
Presenters Keith Chenier
Mississippi State Coastal Research And Extension Center
Co-authors
ES
Eric Sparks
Mississippi State University And Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
CW
Caitlin Wessel
NOAA Marine Debris Program
Ryan Bradley
Mississippi Commercial Fisheries United
AR
Alyssa Rodolfich
Mississippi State Coastal Research And Extension Center
SC
Sarah Cunningham
Mississippi State University
BENEDICT POSADAS
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
Descender Devices or Treat Tethers: Does Barotrauma Mitigation Increase Opportunities for Depredation?View Abstract
03:00 PM - 03:15 PM2020/12/02 21:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:15:00 UTC
Increasing post-release survival of discarded fishes is a critical challenge to the development of effective conservation and management strategies. Among reef fishes, this challenge is further complicated by pressure-related injuries known as barotrauma. To address this, US fishery management agencies are enacting rules requiring fishers to possess descender devices onboard their vessels for barotrauma mitigation purposes. However, requiring possession of descender devices does not guarantee their use. Consequently, any benefits resulting from these regulations rely completely on fishers embracing the use of descender devices. In spite of this, fishers are questioning the survival of fishes released using these devices, claiming that this scenario provides easy opportunities for depredation. If resource managers are to promote descender devices as best practices, they must proactively address fisher concerns about depredation of fishes during descent. To examine if the use of descender devices increases opportunities for depredation, we investigated two disparate fishery-independent camera datasets from the Alabama Artificial Reef Zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The first dataset is from a vertical longline survey, and the second is from a mark-recapture study. Both gears were equipped with downward-facing GoProTM cameras, which allowed the fate of fishes from capture to landing (on the vertical longline) and from surface to bottom release (on hook-and-line) to be recorded. Between 2016 and 2018, GoProTM video footage was collected from 1483 vertical longline sets and 1096 descender releases. During vertical longline sampling, 54 depredation events were recorded, whereas none were recorded during descender releases. While far from a controlled study, this opportunistic comparison of ascending fishes on vertical longline and descending fishes on descender devices indicates that fishes on descender devices are substantially less prone to depredation – a finding that could ultimately promote the use of descender devices by stakeholders.
Presenters Marcus Drymon
Mississippi State University & Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
Co-authors Amanda Jefferson
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
Crystal Hightower
University Of South Alabama/Dauphin Island Sea Lab
SP
Sean Powers
University Of South Alabama/Dauphin Island Sea Lab
Understanding and Enhancing Angler Satisfaction with Fisheries Management: Insights from the “Great Red Snapper Count”View Abstract
03:15 PM - 03:30 PM2020/12/02 21:15:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:30:00 UTC
Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) management has been a topic of much scientific debate and intensive public scrutiny. In response to political, public, and management desires for more robust data on Red Snapper populations, a Gulf-wide initiative commonly referred to as the “Great Red Snapper Count” (GRSC) was funded to estimate the absolute abundance of Red Snapper in the US Gulf of Mexico. Here, we describe the results of an online survey designed to: a) characterize the social dimensions of Red Snapper anglers, b) measure satisfaction with current Red Snapper populations and regulations, c) assess overall patterns of awareness of the GRSC, and d) evaluate the potential benefits of GRSC stakeholder engagement videos. A key finding of our survey was that awareness of the GRSC was associated with up to 3 times higher satisfaction with fisheries management. Among the core GRSC components, awareness was greatest of the tagging program; however, satisfaction was greatest among anglers aware of the habitat characterization component. Through an in-survey experiment, we found that anglers presented a video on specific GRSC project components reported slightly higher management satisfaction than those presented an overview video or no video. Collectively, our results indicate that angler awareness, when underpinned by effective engagement and outreach activities, can enhance angler satisfaction.
Presenters Amanda Jefferson
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
Co-authors
SS
Steven Scyphers
Northeastern University
Marcus Drymon
Mississippi State University & Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
KF
Kelsi Furman
Northeastern University
EC
Elizabeth Conley
Northeastern University
YN
Yvette Niwa
Northeastern University
Gregory Stunz
Texas A&M University Corpus Christi
A Synthesis of Fishermen Training Programs Across the United StatesView Abstract
03:30 PM - 03:45 PM2020/12/02 21:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:45:00 UTC
Commercial fishing is a culturally and economically important industry in coastal regions across the United States. During the past 30 years, the average age of commercial fishermen has increased substantially. This trend is commonly referred to as the “greying of the fleet” and is attributed to a substantial decrease in the number of new commercial fishermen entering the industry. Fishermen training programs can provide the infrastructure needed to encourage new entrants into this sector, including training and matching entrants with captains; however, no comprehensive lists of these programs exist. We therefore sought to collect information on existing commercial fishermen training programs across the United States. Given the increased popularity of recreational fishing, aquaculture, and stewardship, we also included information on these types of training programs. We first performed a Google search to identify existing programs. Then, we entered program information into an online database, contacted program organizers to obtain additional information and insight, and mapped program locations. We identified a total of 27 programs. Program activity spans from 1981-present; however, 56% of programs were created in the last 5 years. The number of commercial versus recreational programs is relatively equal, and 6 programs are intended for both sectors. Programs are located in most of the coastal and Great Lakes states. Specifically, 36% of programs are located along the Atlantic Coast, 25% along the Gulf Coast or in the Caribbean, 14% in the Great Lakes, 14% in Alaska, and 11% along the continental United States Pacific Coast. Currently, no training programs exist in New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, South Carolina, Texas, Wisconsin, or Minnesota. Our findings illustrate that while a wide variety of fishermen training programs exist, additional efforts are still needed in specific regions.
Presenters Kindall Calhoun
University Of South Alabama & Mississippi State University
Co-authors Amanda Jefferson
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
Marcus Drymon
Mississippi State University & Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
Federal Fishery Management, an Online ResourceView Abstract
03:45 PM - 04:00 PM2020/12/02 21:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 22:00:00 UTC
Federal fishery management is a complex regulatory world, full of acronyms and obscure processes. Decades ago, the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Legal Program (MASGLP) issued Understanding Fisheries Management, a manual last revised in 2005. Since then, fishery management has changed, as has technology. MASGLP is updating the manual not only in content but in format. The new version, Federal Fishery Management, when completed, will include a website with interactive features to demonstrate some of its components. A published version is also planned, as this is one of the MASGLP’s most requested publications. This online publication explains the underlying legal background of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, the structure of Fishery Management Councils, the scientific bases for establishing management levels, and the Fishery Management Plan process. New content includes expanded discussions on FMPs, how they are developed and how they are revised. It explains the vocabulary of how catch limits are set and discusses the different types of limited access fisheries, new sections as a result of the most recent MSA amendments. Additionally, the publication has new sections on observer programs, disaster relief, and other laws influencing fishery management such as the Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. It includes new content using specific examples from the eight regional Fishery Management Councils to explain MSA issues such as enforcement, rebuilding plans, bycatch, and observer programs. There is a more detailed discussion of habitat protection. These sections include Legal Sidebars with case law illustrating how these practices are used. This presentation, by Kristina Alexander, the author of the new manual, and a Sr. Research Counsel at MASGLP, will demonstrate the new product, its features, and content.
Assessing abundance, distribution, and reproductive output of the Mississippi blue crab spawning stockView Abstract
04:00 PM - 04:15 PM2020/12/02 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 22:15:00 UTC
Blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, support valuable commercial fisheries throughout much of their range, including the Gulf of Mexico. Over the last five years (2015–2019), Gulf-wide annual commercial landings averaged 51 million pounds for an annual dockside value of over $70 million. Despite active management on the state level, many states have seen declines in blue crab harvest and fishery independent estimates of abundance, potentially indicative of declines in spawning stock abundance, larval abundance, postlarval recruitment, or juvenile survival. Blue crab management and stock assessment efforts in the Gulf of Mexico have typically lagged behind the primary crab-harvesting states of the Atlantic Coast due to a lack of fishery independent data on spawning stock abundance and a lack of understanding of blue crab life history, connectivity, and movements within and among Gulf Coast estuaries. We are addressing this data gap by conducting a 2-year assessment of blue crab abundance, reproductive output, migratory movements, and exploitation rates in the vicinity of the Mississippi barrier islands, a valuable spawning area for blue crabs in the northcentral Gulf of Mexico. Blue crabs are sampled monthly at Horn and Cat Islands using traps and bimonthly using trawls. Egg samples are collected from ovigerous crabs for assessment of fecundity and egg quality. Additionally, 2400 mature female blue crabs will be tagged and released to examine movement patterns and assess exploitation rates. The proposed work will directly benefit Mississippi and the surrounding states by providing data that can be directly incorporated into future blue crab stock assessments and management decisions, thus improving management of this valuable fishery.
Presenters M. Zachary Darnell
The University Of Southern Mississippi
easy scroll
2020/12/02 20:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:00:00 UTC Commercial Shrimper Engagement in Derelict Crab Trap Remo...
2020/12/02 21:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:15:00 UTC Descender Devices or Treat Tethers: Does Barotrauma Mitig...
2020/12/02 21:15:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:30:00 UTC Understanding and Enhancing Angler Satisfaction with Fish...
2020/12/02 21:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 21:45:00 UTC A Synthesis of Fishermen Training Programs Across the Uni...
2020/12/02 21:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 22:00:00 UTC Federal Fishery Management, an Online Resource
2020/12/02 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 22:15:00 UTC Assessing abundance, distribution, and reproductive outpu...
Mississippi State Coastal Research and Extension Center
Mississippi State University & Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium; Mississippi State University
University of South Alabama & Mississippi State University
+ 1 more speakers. View All
No moderator for this session!
Mississippi State University, Coastal Research and Extension Center
Ms. Leah Morgan
Partnership for the Delaware Estuary
Pelican Coast Conservancy
Mr. Anthony Vedral
Mississippi State Coastal Research and Extension Center
+ 53 more attendees. View All
Gaelyn Grosgood job keith!
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Amanda JeffersonThank you for attending. If you watch these presentations after the conclusion of the session, you can still ask questions via the Q&A box. The questions will be sent by email to the speakers.
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Crystal HightowerLooking forward to seeing the new guide Kristina! This is one of the resources I always share with our interns and new students! A much appreciated document for sure!! Thank you!!
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Mandy SartainI will forever tune-in to any Marcus Drymon talks. Always so wonderful. Great work, Marcus!
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Melissa SchneiderSpeakers can see pending questions in the Q&A tab under "unanswered." Please note that if another question comes in while you are typing an answer, you will lose what you typed. You might consider typing in Word or email or somewhere else and pasting into the Q&A.
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Mandy SartainKeith! Good job! Keep up the amazing work
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Kristina AlexanderGreat video of a snapper playing possum, Marcus.
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Melissa Schneider Hi, Kristina. Good to see you at B&B!
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Ms. Alexis SabineGreat presentation!
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Amanda JeffersonHello. I will be moderating this session. Please view the presentation schedule for this session. All presentation videos are available on demand once the session opens. The Q&A tab has a dropdown menu where you can identify which speaker you wish to send a question. Please use the Q&A feature to ask the speakers questions, and use the chat to for general conversation (“Great talk, etc.”) or to let me know of technical problems.
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Kristina Alexander You are killin' it as a moderator, Amanda!
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Crystal Hightower Great presentation Amanda!!
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