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Virtual 3-Minute Lightning Talk Water Quality and Quantity
Dec 01, 2020 04:00 PM - Dec 31, 2020 05:00 PM (America/Chicago) Switch to local time
20201201T1600 20201201T1700 America/Chicago Lightning Talks - Water Quality and Quantity

The bays and bayous of the coastal zone are squeezed between the land and sea, which leads to strong connections to both environments. As a result, direct modification to conditions in coastal systems and alterations to adjacent systems (e.g. watersheds, rivers, shelf waters) can affect changes in water quality. This underscores the difficulties associated with maintaining good water quality, as well as managing recreational, commercial and industrial interests that all depend on these water bodies. Increasingly frequent droughts and floods compound this difficulty, resulting in disruptions to normal patterns of freshwater availability. Potential presentations in this track include: how we assess these alterations in quality and quantity, how changes in the types and rates of terrestrial, aquatic and marine processes and activities have affected water quality, how we identify the human health and ecosystem impacts associated with these alterations, how we use this information to improve and better manage this critical resource, how we address water quality and quantity issues in formal and informal education and how we bring about behavior change to protect water quality. 

Virtual 2020 Bays and Bayous Symposium melissa.schneider@usm.edu
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logoMobile Bay National Estuary Program logoMississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium logoThe University of Southern Mississippi  logoDauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation logoAlabama State Port Authority logoMississippi Commercial Fisheries United logoGulf of Mexico Alliance logoHydro, LLC logoGeosyntec  logoNorthern Gulf Institute logoGoodwyn Mills & Cawood, Inc. logoNeel-Schaffer, inc. logoHeadwaters LLC logoStantec Consulting Services Inc. logoDog River Clearwater Revival logoEnvironmental Science Associates (ESA) logoThompson Engineering logo

The bays and bayous of the coastal zone are squeezed between the land and sea, which leads to strong connections to both environments. As a result, direct modification to conditions in coastal systems and alterations to adjacent systems (e.g. watersheds, rivers, shelf waters) can affect changes in water quality. This underscores the difficulties associated with maintaining good water quality, as well as managing recreational, commercial and industrial interests that all depend on these water bodies. Increasingly frequent droughts and floods compound this difficulty, resulting in disruptions to normal patterns of freshwater availability. Potential presentations in this track include: how we assess these alterations in quality and quantity, how changes in the types and rates of terrestrial, aquatic and marine processes and activities have affected water quality, how we identify the human health and ecosystem impacts associated with these alterations, how we use this information to improve and better manage this critical resource, how we address water quality and quantity issues in formal and informal education and how we bring about behavior change to protect water quality. 

Residual rice husk char valorization as adsorbent for removal of methylene blue and ethinylestradiol from waterView Abstract 3-Minute Lightning Talk
04:00 PM - 05:00 PM2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC
Rice husks (RH) are the hard-protective coverings of grains of rice and are removed from rice seeds as a side stream during the milling process. The disposal of RH generates a huge problem for rice industry since RH represents about 23% of initial rice seed weight. The valorization of this side stream could solve the disposal problem and reduce the cost of waste treatment. One possible use of the RH is to burn them as fuel for energy and vapor production. The ash obtained during that process is called rice husk ash (RHA). RHA disposal still generates high disposal costs. Different uses are considered for RHA valorization. Regarding the use of RHA as an adsorbent, previous work efforts are focused on water treatment. This concept has potential benefits on both water treatment and waste management. This work provides an assessment of the adsorption capacity of bio-chars prepared from rice husks. Rice husk char (RH-Char), pre-treated rice husk char (PT-Char) and industrial rice husk char (M-Char) are tested as adsorbents for the removal of methylene blue (MB) and ethinylestradiol (EE2). Results show that RH-Char and PT-Char present zeta-potential values near -52 mV and are rich in amorphous SiO2. M-Char shows a zeta-potential value of -32 mV and has crystalline SiO2. The bio-chars remove MB and EE2 efficiently. The adsorption capacity values for MB (in μmol/g ) are 769.2 (RH-Char), 41.2 (PT-Char), and 31.7 (M-Char). The adsorption capacity values for EE2 (in μmol/g) are: 33.1 (RH-Char), 19.1 (PT-Char), and 16.9 (M-Char). The information gathered in this work evidences the potential of rice husks bio-chars for bio-remediation and may in future contribute to the conversion of this side-stream to value-added materials.
Presenters Jonathan Lacuesta
College Of Engineering, University Of The Republic
Co-authors
BV
Beatriz Vega
Auburn University
LS
Liji Sobhana
Åbo Akademi University
DK
Dennis Kronlund
Åbo Akademi University
JP
Jouko Peltonen
Åbo Akademi University
SG
Soledad Gutiérrez
Universidad De La República
PF
Pedro Fardim
KU Leuven
Microbial Source Tracking in Shellfish Growing Areas View Abstract 3-Minute Lightning Talk
04:00 PM - 05:00 PM2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC
Bays, estuaries, and rivers provide vital ecological, economical, and recreational services to coastal communities. These vital water bodies are under increasing pressures from urbanization, land-use changes, population growth, a changing climate, sea-level rise, and extreme weather events. Closures of shellfish harvesting (and recreational) coastal and inland waters are most often due to fecal contamination. Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) can come from many sources; leaking sanitary sewers, pets, livestock, wildlife, and birds. Understanding the origin (source) of fecal pollution at locations where shellfish are grown is essential in assessing the associated human health risks as well as the determining actions required to manage shellfish harvesting areas. Regulatory methods for monitoring fecal contamination cannot differentiate between human and non-human fecal sources. Management and mitigation of fecal pollution entering shellfish waters would be more cost-effective if species-specific identification of the sources of fecal contamination were possible. To help address this gap, DNA-based genetic fingerprinting methods, collectively referred to as Microbial Source Tracking (MST) are gaining use, particularly as tools to supplement watershed assessments. Although MST-based studies have focused on beach and recreational waters, fewer have addressed their applicability for assessing shellfish growing areas. The overall objective of this project is to identify the species-specific source(s) of fecal contamination impairing shellfish harvesting waters in the Fowl River Bay area. Our experimental approach is to apply DNA-based source tracking methods using species-specific FIB markers for human, avian, ruminant, and domestic animal fecal bacteria present in water samples collected from designated shellfish harvesting locations in the Fowl River Bay. During this presentation, preliminary data for the applicability of a set of species-specific DNA markers for shellfish harvesting waters will be discussed.
Presenters Patrice Crawford
The University Of Alabama
Co-authors
PS
Patricia Sobecky
The University Of Alabama
Low Impact Development Gulf Coast : a community engagement tool to influence perceptions, practice and policy around sustainable stormwater managementView Abstract 3-Minute Lightning Talk
04:00 PM - 05:00 PM2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC
Low Impact Development (LID) is an approach to land development that preserves natural resources and uses natural processes in a designed approach to slow, disburse, and filter stormwater close to its source to allow for soil infiltration, thereby preventing flooding and protecting the water quality in our rivers, bays, and bayous. Commercial sites, parks, green ways, new development subdivisions, medians, and urban street-scapes all provide opportunities to take pressure off existing municipal stormwater systems through Low Impact Development strategies. This presentation will introduce the science behind Low Impact Development as a proven and economically viable stormwater management strategy that will maximize dollars being invested in downstream restoration projects. With significant resources being directed toward these restoration projects directly adjacent to the coastline, the connection between upland management strategies and activities to downstream flooding and natural water body pollution is undeniably more important now than ever. The cross-disciplinary practice of Low Impact Development stormwater management is highlighted in over 50 case studies near the Gulf Coast region in the "L.I.D. Gulf Coast" Story Map which will be showcased during this presentation. This growing collection of regional low impact development and green infrastructure projects serves as a learning tool to inspire practice, and as a catalyst for dialogue to drive sustainable stormwater management policy that will protect our natural water bodies. The audience will be invited to contribute projects to the story map collection, and to become involved in the ongoing dialogue around policy for Low Impact Development on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.
Presenters Tracy Wyman
Mississippi State University / Gulf Coast Community Design Studio
Viable Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the Pensacola and Perdido Bays: Water Column, Sediments, and Invertebrate BiofilmsView Abstract 3-Minute Lightning Talk
04:00 PM - 05:00 PM2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC
Two major problematic waterborne pathogens in coastal Gulf of Mexico include Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. We surveyed 44 locations in 7 major basins for the abundances of these species during a cool winter month, where water temperatures ranged 12.3 – 22.2oC. Viable Vibrio species were enumerated in water column (n=44), sediments (n=43), and invertebrate biofilms (n=14) employing a chromogenic agar assay. In surface waters, V. vulnificus outnumbered V. parahaemolyticus by about 5-fold in most samples and was detected in 37 of 44 water samples, with maximum levels of 3,556 cells/mL. V. parahaemolyticus was only detected in 15 of 44 water samples, but with a maximum concentration of 8,919 cells/mL. On average, V. vulnificus outnumbered V. parahaemolyticus by 18-fold in all sediments. In all but one sediment sample, V. vulnificus was detected, with concentrations from 121 to 607,222 cells/mL. In contrast, V. parahaemolyticus were only detected in 33 of the 43 sediment samples, where concentrations ranged from 28 to 77,333 cells/mL. Of note is the positive significant correlation between V. vulnificus abundances in sediments and the salinity observed in the water column at depth (R=0.3887, p< 0.05), where bottom water salinities ranged from 2 to 28 PSU. Abundances in biofilms, collected from oyster or barnacle shells or from invertebrate worms found in sediment samples, were also evaluated. In comparing biofilm abundances on different types of shells, there was not a statistical difference between oysters (n=5) and barnacles (n=7) for V. vulnificus (p=0.675) or V. parahaemolyticus (p=0.628). This is the first study of the Pensacola Bay System enumerating viable Vibrio abundances and assessing ecological factors affecting their distributions in these 7 basins.
Presenters
TP
Trupti Potdukhe
University Of West Florida
Co-authors Jane M Caffrey
UWF, Center For Environmental Diagnostics And Bioremediation
MS
Michael Swords
University Of West Florida
MR
Mackenzie Rothfus
University Of West Florida
CD
Carrie Daniel
University Of West Florida, Center For Environmental Diagnostics And Bioremediation
WJ
Wade Jeffrey
University Of West Florida
BA
Barbara Albrecht
University Of West Florida
LW
Lisa Waidner
University Of West Florida
easy scroll
2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC Residual rice husk char valorization as adsorbent for rem...
2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC Microbial Source Tracking in Shellfish Growing Areas
2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC Low Impact Development Gulf Coast : a community engagemen...
2020/12/01 22:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 23:00:00 UTC Viable Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the P...
College of Engineering, University of the Republic
Mississippi State University / Gulf Coast Community Design Studio
The University of Alabama
University of West Florida
No moderator for this session!
Dr. Marcus Drymon
Mississippi State University & Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant
University of West Florida
 Patrice  Crawford
The University of Alabama
Dr. Jane M Caffrey
UWF, Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation
+ 26 more attendees. View All
Rusty GriceThank you for attending. If you watch these presentations after the conclusion of the session, you can still ask questions via the Q&A box. The questions will be sent by email to the speakers.
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Ms. Debi FosterCool! LID Gulf Coast Story Map!
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Ruth Carmichael Nice presentation Trupti!
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Ms. Trupti Potdukhe Thank you for the kind words! :)
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Dr. Patricia SobeckyHi Rusty, Patrice Crawford & I are logged on! Best regards Patty Sobecky
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Rusty Grice Hello and good afternoon!
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Rusty GriceHello. I will be moderating this session. Please view the presentation schedule for this session. All presentation videos are available on demand once the session opens. The Q&A tab has a dropdown menu where you can identify which speaker you wish to send a question. Please use the Q&A feature to ask the speakers questions, and use the chat to for general conversation (“Great talk, etc.”) or to let me know of technical problems.
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