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Virtual Oral Abstracts Water Quality and Quantity
Dec 02, 2020 10:00 AM - Dec 31, 2020 11:30 AM (America/Chicago) Switch to local time
20201202T1000 20201202T1130 America/Chicago Water Quality and Quantity - Pollution & Microplastics (Oral)

The bays and bayous of the coastal zone are squeezed between the land and sea, which leads to strong connections to both environments. As a result, direct modification to conditions in coastal systems and alterations to adjacent systems (e.g. watersheds, rivers, shelf waters) can affect changes in water quality. This underscores the difficulties associated with maintaining good water quality, as well as managing recreational, commercial and industrial interests that all depend on these water bodies. Increasingly frequent droughts and floods compound this difficulty, resulting in disruptions to normal patterns of freshwater availability. Potential presentations in this track include: how we assess these alterations in quality and quantity, how changes in the types and rates of terrestrial, aquatic and marine processes and activities have affected water quality, how we identify the human health and ecosystem impacts associated with these alterations, how we use this information to improve and better manage this critical resource, how we address water quality and quantity issues in formal and informal education and how we bring about behavior change to protect water quality. 

Virtual 2020 Bays and Bayous Symposium melissa.schneider@usm.edu
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logoMobile Bay National Estuary Program logoMississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium logoThe University of Southern Mississippi  logoDauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation logoAlabama State Port Authority logoMississippi Commercial Fisheries United logoGulf of Mexico Alliance logoHydro, LLC logoGeosyntec  logoNorthern Gulf Institute logoGoodwyn Mills & Cawood, Inc. logoNeel-Schaffer, inc. logoHeadwaters LLC logoStantec Consulting Services Inc. logoDog River Clearwater Revival logoEnvironmental Science Associates (ESA) logoThompson Engineering logo

The bays and bayous of the coastal zone are squeezed between the land and sea, which leads to strong connections to both environments. As a result, direct modification to conditions in coastal systems and alterations to adjacent systems (e.g. watersheds, rivers, shelf waters) can affect changes in water quality. This underscores the difficulties associated with maintaining good water quality, as well as managing recreational, commercial and industrial interests that all depend on these water bodies. Increasingly frequent droughts and floods compound this difficulty, resulting in disruptions to normal patterns of freshwater availability. Potential presentations in this track include: how we assess these alterations in quality and quantity, how changes in the types and rates of terrestrial, aquatic and marine processes and activities have affected water quality, how we identify the human health and ecosystem impacts associated with these alterations, how we use this information to improve and better manage this critical resource, how we address water quality and quantity issues in formal and informal education and how we bring about behavior change to protect water quality. 

Fluorescent conjugated polymers to sense polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbonsView Abstract Oral Presentation
10:00 AM - 10:15 AM2020/12/02 16:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 16:15:00 UTC
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly harmful environmental pollutant particularly relevant to waterways. These molecules have characteristic absorption and fluorescence spectra; however, their low effective concentrations makes their chemical sensing and quantitation challenging. We established that these hydrocarbons modulate the emission of the fluorescent moieties embedded in poly(fluorene) conjugated polymers to which we introduced variations in the conjugated core, as well as in the branches coming off the backbone. We focused on polymers including phenylbenzimidazole groups or polyethylene glycol chains as pendant chains. We showed that small PAH molecules quenched the fluorescence of these polymers based on an inner-filter effect whose effectiveness is characteristic of each PAH structure, thus making these polymers effective promiscuous sensors for these hydrocarbons. Indeed, we showed that the interaction patterns between these polymers and the "EPA 16" PAHs is sufficiently rich and nuanced that it contains sufficient information for chemical differentiation of these species.
Presenters
MB
Marco Bonizzoni
The University Of Alabama
Co-authors Michael Ihde
The University Of Alabama
The Occurrence and Distribution of Microplastics in Oysters from the Mississippi SoundView Abstract Oral Presentation
10:15 AM - 10:30 AM2020/12/02 16:15:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 16:30:00 UTC
The occurrence of microplastic (MP) pollution in consumer seafood is an increasingly studied and worrying circumstance. Microplastics have been found to negatively impact marine life that ingests them and filter feeding organisms and detritivores are particularly vulnerable. Compounding this, many of these species, like oysters, are foundational species, which provide a variety of valuable ecosystem services and are commercially and culturally significant in communities along the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM). Oysters are commonly used as bioindicators of water quality as they are susceptible to marine pollutants and changes in marine ecosystems. Our previous work on MPs in the Mississippi River Basin suggested that the Gulf of Mexico acts as a sink for MP pollution being funneled through the Mississippi River and that the marine life therein is exposed to relatively high levels of MPs compared to other coastlines. In ongoing research, we are analyzing both whole and dissected tissues (digestive tract, mantle, gills) of oysters sourced from multiple sites in the Mississippi Sound to evaluate both the concentration and types of MPs present. Furthermore, the dissection and analysis of individual tissues shows where the MPs accumulate within the oyster. The MPs are extracted and isolated using sample preparation methods newly developed in our laboratory and characterized using multiple techniques, including micro-Fourier Transform Infrared (µ-FTIR) and Laser Direct Infrared (LDIR) Imaging, which provide MP counts, morphologies, polymeric compositions, and sizes. This talk will include discussion of the methodology and preliminary data on the compartmentalization of MPs within Gulf Coast oysters and on the concentrations and characteristics of MPs at oyster reefs in the nGoM.
Presenters
AS
Austin Scircle
University Of Mississippi
Co-authors
DG
Deborah Gochfeld
University Of Mississippi
JC
JAMES CIZDZIEL
University Of Mississippi
Ann Fairly Barnett
University Of Mississippi Department Of Biomolecular Sciences, Division Of Environmental Toxicology
Availability and Assessment of Microplastic Ingestion by Marsh Birds in Mississippi Gulf Coast Tidal MarshesView Abstract Oral Presentation
10:30 AM - 10:45 AM2020/12/02 16:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 16:45:00 UTC
Research on the fate and uptake of plastic pollutants in tidal marsh ecosystems is sparse. In an attempt to quantify microplastic prevalence in tidal marsh ecosystems along the coast of Mississippi, we sampled marsh sediments and resident tidal marsh bird stomach contents within three marsh complexes along the Mississippi Coast. To investigate the availability of microplastic pollutants in the marsh habitat, we collected marsh sediment samples at 12 sampling locations within the marsh complexes. To investigate possible microplastic ingestion by resident tidal marsh birds, we captured Clapper Rails (Rallus crepitans) and Seaside Sparrows (Ammospiza maritima) near each sampling location and performed non-lethal stomach flushing to obtain a sample of their stomach contents. We used generalized linear models to differentiate microplastic counts in sediment and bird stomach samples among species, marsh complex, the distance from the Gulf of Mexico, and combinations of these variables. We detected microplastics in 64% of marsh sediment samples, 83% of Clapper Rail, and 69% of Seaside Sparrow stomach samples. The dominant types of microplastics detected in sediment and bird samples were fibers. Model selection showed random and highly variable microplastic concentrations in the tidal marsh sediments within and between marsh complexes. The top models for microplastic counts in marsh bird stomach samples included species and microplastics concentration in the nearby sediments. This study provides the first evidence of microplastic ingestion by resident tidal marsh birds and the first study of microplastic prevalence and distribution within tidal marshes along the Mississippi coast.
Presenters
SW
Spencer Weitzel
Mississippi State University
Co-authors
JF
Jared Feura
Mississippi State University
SR
Scott Rush
Mississippi State University
RI
Ray B. Iglay
Mississippi State University
MW
Mark S. Woodrey
Mississippi State University
NOAA NCEI Global Marine Microplastic Database InitiativeView Abstract Oral Presentation
10:45 AM - 11:00 AM2020/12/02 16:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:00:00 UTC
Marine microplastics (< 5 mm) pollution is a growing problem affecting coastal communities, marine ecosystems, aquatic and marine life, and human health. It is hard to escape news of debris of all kinds, and more specifically plastic debris of all sizes, in our oceans. Despite the growing awareness, data management of measurements of marine debris, from large size visual surveys along the coast and in the open ocean, to effects of microplastics on planktonic communities, lags far behind the needs of the scientific, education, and decision maker communities. This lack of large-scale, long-term, comprehensive data on microplastics makes it difficult to completely understand the sources, distribution and impacts of microplastics. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), the nation’s environmental data steward, is spearheading efforts to make available global data on microplastics. NCEI is currently collating (micro)plastic data from across the world and inputting this into a database. The goal is to develop a one-stop repository where data on all types of marine debris and microplastics are aggregated, archived, and served in a consistent and reliable manner. This will establish NCEI as the primary location for marine debris data management. The database, when completed, hopes to contain extensive information on global microplastics. Together with other NCEI databases, such as the Global Ocean Current Database, World Ocean Database, and the Surface Underway Marine Database etc., researchers and interest groups will be able to access and assess data that will enable new insights in understanding of the global microplastic problems. The microplastic database will be freely accessible and will be maintained with newly received data from global users.
Presenters
EN
Ebenezer Nyadjro
Mississippi State University
Co-authors
ZW
Zhankun Wang
Mississippi State University
TB
Tim Boyer
NOAA
SC
Scott Cross
NOAA
JC
Just Cebrian
Northern Gulf Institute
easy scroll
2020/12/02 16:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 16:15:00 UTC Fluorescent conjugated polymers to sense polycyclic aroma...
2020/12/02 16:15:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 16:30:00 UTC The Occurrence and Distribution of Microplastics in Oyste...
2020/12/02 16:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 16:45:00 UTC Availability and Assessment of Microplastic Ingestion by ...
2020/12/02 16:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:00:00 UTC NOAA NCEI Global Marine Microplastic Database Initiative
Mississippi State University
University of Mississippi
Mississippi State University
The University of Alabama
No moderator for this session!
University of Mississippi
Auburn University School of Fisheries Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences/MASGC
US FDA Gulf Coast Seafood Laboratory
USM-GCRL-FISHERIES CENTER
U.S. FDA - Division of Seafood Science and Technology, Gulf Coast Seafood Laboratory
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Kirsten LarsenThank you for attending. If you watch these presentations after the conclusion of the session, you can still ask questions via the Q&A box. The questions will be sent by email to the speakers.
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Kirsten LarsenNice job to all the speakers! I've learned quite a bit in this session.
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Mandy SartainWonderful talk, Spencer! Sounds like a super neat project.
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Kirsten LarsenHello. I will be moderating this session. Please view the presentation schedule for this session. All presentation videos are available on demand once the session opens. The Q&A tab has a dropdown menu where you can identify which speaker you wish to send a question. Please use the Q&A feature to ask the speakers questions, and use the chat to for general conversation (“Great talk, etc.”) or to let me know of technical problems.
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