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Virtual Oral Abstracts Resilient Communities and Economies
Dec 03, 2020 10:30 AM - Dec 31, 2020 12:00 Noon (America/Chicago) Switch to local time
20201203T1030 20201203T1200 America/Chicago Resilient Communities and Economies (Oral)

This track will encompass natural, anthropogenic and social impacts to coastal hazard resilience and how communities adapt to these impacts. It will encourage a broad range of presentations focusing on state and local efforts to minimize environmental impacts while enhancing economic opportunities and improving resilience to both natural and technological hazards. This track will also include education and outreach efforts to raise awareness and understand climate and hazard challenges. Topics may include land policies; innovative floodplain management strategies; sustainable building design techniques and methodologies; community response and adaptation activities related to climate change, sea level rise and inundation events; and cultural and sociological impacts associated with natural and anthropogenic coastal hazards. Submissions discussing resilience-related topics, including engineering, modeling, tools, remote sensing, field-based experiments, social vulnerability indexing, and other topically-relevant behavioral science are also encouraged.

Virtual 2020 Bays and Bayous Symposium melissa.schneider@usm.edu
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logoMobile Bay National Estuary Program logoMississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium logoThe University of Southern Mississippi  logoDauphin Island Sea Lab Foundation logoAlabama State Port Authority logoMississippi Commercial Fisheries United logoGulf of Mexico Alliance logoHydro, LLC logoGeosyntec  logoNorthern Gulf Institute logoGoodwyn Mills & Cawood, Inc. logoNeel-Schaffer, inc. logoHeadwaters LLC logoStantec Consulting Services Inc. logoDog River Clearwater Revival logoEnvironmental Science Associates (ESA) logoThompson Engineering logo

This track will encompass natural, anthropogenic and social impacts to coastal hazard resilience and how communities adapt to these impacts. It will encourage a broad range of presentations focusing on state and local efforts to minimize environmental impacts while enhancing economic opportunities and improving resilience to both natural and technological hazards. This track will also include education and outreach efforts to raise awareness and understand climate and hazard challenges. Topics may include land policies; innovative floodplain management strategies; sustainable building design techniques and methodologies; community response and adaptation activities related to climate change, sea level rise and inundation events; and cultural and sociological impacts associated with natural and anthropogenic coastal hazards. Submissions discussing resilience-related topics, including engineering, modeling, tools, remote sensing, field-based experiments, social vulnerability indexing, and other topically-relevant behavioral science are also encouraged.

Successfully Rebuilding Bayou La Batre's WaterfrontView Abstract Oral Presentation
10:30 AM - 10:45 AM2020/12/03 16:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 16:45:00 UTC
Together with the City of Bayou La Batre, the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Mobile County, and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, The Nature Conservancy implemented a large scale restoration project committed to protecting and preserving the coastal community of Bayou La Batre from future storms and coastal hazards as well as revitalizing the locally important waterfront area by restoring, enhancing, and protecting the shoreline habitats and providing improved community access for recreation and fishing opportunities. Designed with Moffatt & Nichol, the Lightning Point Restoration project included about 1 mile of overlapping breakwaters, 40 acres of marsh, tidal creeks and scrub shrub habitats, and more than 240,000 cubic yards of repurposed dredged material to create the new habitats and storm buffer along the community’s waterfront. This restoration project began in Fall 2019 and was completed in less than 10 months in Summer 2020. The implementation of Lightning Point Restoration project was successful due to the project team addressing various potential barriers before construction began. These barriers involved community acceptance, technical feasibility, funding limitations, political support, legal concerns, cost and benefit of actions, and consistence with community and regional environmental goals. By understanding the logistics and the impact of the Lightning Point Restoration project on the local coastal community of Bayou La Batre, The Nature Conservancy and Moffatt & Nichol were able to translate these concerns to the contractor to ensure that the project was constructed with integrity and set the stage for future complex restoration projects.
Presenters Mary Kate Brown
The Nature Conservancy
Co-authors Meg Goecker
Moffatt & Nichol
JH
Judy Haner
The Nature Conservancy
Building Coastal Resiliency in Santa Rosa County, FL View Abstract Oral Presentation
10:45 AM - 11:00 AM2020/12/03 16:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:00:00 UTC
In 2017, 25% of all US counties received at least one major presidential disaster declaration. In 2020, this trend continues with devastating wildfires, stronger hurricanes, extreme flooding, intense tornadoes, and other natural disasters. Since 2004, Santa Rosa County (SRC) has been included in 13 declared disasters. In addition, increased population and infrastructure has led SRC to begin to address resiliency issues. In 2018, SRC received $12,000 from the Florida Beverage Association’s Community Environmental Sustainability Award to begin the SRC Green Infrastructure (GI) Stormwater Management and Educational Outreach Program. Also, in 2018, SRC staff were admitted to NACo’s Strengthening Coastal Counties Resilience Technical Assistance Program. This program began discussions of the County’s existing resilience assets, needs, and how the team can use the program resources to accomplish resilience-building goals. These initiatives have resulted in SRC receiving a NOAA Northern Gulf of Mexico Resilience to Future Flooding grant to conduct a county-wide vulnerability assessment. Results from this assessment will help the team find the intersections between the environmental and socio-economic factors that make communities most vulnerable to flooding disasters. The county has partnered with the University of Florida for an EPA-funded Resiliency to Coastal Flooding Project, in which the project team will work with local communities to determine storm-water impacts and recommend GI practices that mitigate diminished water quality and flooding. SRC received a $120,000 Resilient Coastlines Program grant to assess and determine the most suitable type of nature-based living shoreline for Floridatown park. SRC will work with community stakeholders to determine the type of nature-based structure for this location. These projects have resulted in a greater understanding of resiliency issues and needs within the county by stakeholders and community leaders. The team continues to initiate projects that promote resiliency in Santa Rosa County, FL.
Presenters Chris Verlinde
UF/IFAS Fl. Sea Grant Extension
Co-authors
SA
Shelley Alexander
Santa Rosa County, FL
TG
Tanya Gallagher
Santa Rosa County, FL
TL
Tanya Linzy
Santa Rosa County- Environmental Department
ND
Naisy Dolar
Santa Rosa County
BB
Brad Baker
Santa Rosa County, FL
SW
Shawn Ward
Santa Rosa County, FL
Africatown Connections Blueway: Healing Begins by Reclaiming Our Heritage & HappinessView Abstract Oral Presentation
11:00 AM - 11:15 AM2020/12/03 17:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:15:00 UTC
Africatown, located in Mobile, Alabama, represents a community settled by captives brought to the United States from Africa by slave ship Clotilda, known as the last slave ship to arrive in the USA. Africatown is unique in that it represents a group of Africans who were forcefully removed from their homeland, sold into slavery, and then formed their own, largely self-governing community, all the while maintaining a strong sense of African cultural heritage. By establishing the Africatown Connections Blueway, descendants of the original founders of Africatown, seek to re-connect their neighbors to the surrounding waterways from which they have been separated. Of primary importance is to preserve and make available the international historical significance of Africatown to communities across Alabama, the United States and the entire world in hopes of contributing to the healing process from the sadness that stems from long lost ties to Africa. The Africatown Story inspires hope and resilience, which are both much needed in today’s current affairs. Once a self-sustained community nourished from the bounty of the surrounding waters, native wildlife, fruits and nuts Africatown is now a community reclaiming its connection to the waterways of the Mobile, AL metro area and its ties to African heritage. The story is challenging to tell and at times uncomfortable for both decedents of slaves and decedents of slave holding families. In order to tell the story, community members see the waterways as the common element for healing and renewal for all connected to the history whether in the Mobile Metro area or in numerous nations of Africa.
Presenters Liz Smith-Incer
National Park Service - Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance Program
Implementing the 3 Key Goals of the Collaborative 8-County Gulf-Houston Regional Conservation PlanView Abstract Oral Presentation
11:15 AM - 11:30 AM2020/12/03 17:15:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:30:00 UTC
The 8-county Gulf-Houston Regional Conservation Plan (RCP) is a long-term collaborative of environmental, business, and governmental entities working together to implement an ecosystem resilience plan for the large Gulf-Houston region through 3 Key Goals: 1) Increasing the current 14.7% in protected/preserved land in the eight-county region to 24% of land coverage by 2040; 2) Increasing and supporting the region-wide land management efforts to install nature-based stabilization (NBS) techniques, such as low-impact development, living shorelines, and bioswales, to 50% of land coverage by 2040; and 3) Providing research and advocacy for an increase of 4% annually in air quality offsets through carbon absorption in native soils, plants, trees, and oyster reefs throughout the eight county region. The Gulf-Houston RCP prioritizes the environmental projects in the region that are in need of full or partial funding (called the Working List of Projects), and tracks the funded projects bi-annually. By doing so, HW is able to measure the progress being made in the region toward achieving the 3 key goals. The Gulf-Houston RCP creates a road map for resilience against major storm events and other stressors across the 8-county region now and for years to come. For projects funded over the last 5 years, more than 39,000 acres of protected/preserved land has been acquired or is under conservation easements and more than 39, 000 acres are under restorative enhancements with various funds received. Over 731,000 acres of additional land acquisition and conservation easements are possible if targeted projects become funded. The 4% annual increase in organic carbon sequestration will occur mainly through large-scale targeted native tree plantings and will assist in reducing the CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere, which for the Gulf-Houston region is a substantial stressor.
Presenters Deborah January-Bevers
Houston Wilderness
Whither Resilience? Emerging Issues in Coastal Water Law and PolicyView Abstract Oral Presentation
11:30 AM - 11:45 AM2020/12/03 17:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:45:00 UTC
Nearly 40% of all U.S. citizens now live within 100 miles of our nation’s coastlines. Human encroachment into coastal environments, and the reliance on the food, water, and services they provide, have triggered dramatic changes in the structure and productivity of many estuarine ecosystems signaling the fact that water policy is closely coupled with human socioeconomic systems. As such, resilient coastal communities will need to initiate new efforts in water policy to develop data-driven conservation plans that provide for the wise stewardship of our coastal resources for future generations. The Mobile delta, Mobile Bay estuary, and coastal Alabama are major state assets, and include many environmentally important and biologically productive areas, as well as natural resources such as timber, fisheries, and oil and gas. Application of water law and policy to the coastal area’s natural resources and future management of this socio-ecologic complex will require in-depth knowledge of the region’s hydrology, geology, biology, geomorphology, topography, and ongoing natural processes. Emerging law and policy issues include, but are not limited to, saltwater encroachment, contamination of water resources from more frequent and intense tropical storms and hurricanes, flows into the Mobile delta and Mobile Bay, shoreline erosion, and sea level changes. Most cases currently applicable to surface water law in Alabama were decided in the 1800s, but case law controlling groundwater use in the state is generally from 20th century decisions. The collection of legal and policy instruments demonstrates the interfaces among science, policy, and law in water resources policymaking, promotes the goals of the state by illustrating the importance of continued water investigations, and informs the ongoing statewide surface water and groundwater assessments in Alabama.
Presenters Greg Guthrie
Geological Survey Of Alabama
Co-authors Bennett Bearden
Geological Survey Of Alabama
JV
John Valentine
Dauphin Island Sea Lab
SJ
Stephen Jones
Geological Survey Of Alabama
easy scroll
2020/12/03 16:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 16:45:00 UTC Successfully Rebuilding Bayou La Batre's Waterfront
2020/12/03 16:45:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:00:00 UTC Building Coastal Resiliency in Santa Rosa County, FL
2020/12/03 17:00:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:15:00 UTC Africatown Connections Blueway: Healing Begins by Reclaim...
2020/12/03 17:15:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:30:00 UTC Implementing the 3 Key Goals of the Collaborative 8-Count...
2020/12/03 17:30:00 UTC - 2020/12/31 17:45:00 UTC Whither Resilience? Emerging Issues in Coastal Water Law ...
Houston Wilderness
Geological Survey of Alabama
National Park Service - Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance Program
UF/IFAS Fl. Sea Grant Extension
The Nature Conservancy
No moderator for this session!
Southern Mississippi Planning & Development District
 ASHLEY BENNIS
Texas Sea Grant
 Cortney Cortez
The Balmoral Group
Pelican Coast Conservancy
+ 56 more attendees. View All
Renee ColliniHi Greg, my questions still seem to be delayed on the Q&A - so I wanted to quickly follow up: Thank you for the clarification. My understanding is that the ACCP will have all those things when they are done, the story map was simply a platform to communicate some of the findings. If you're looking for examples at the local level of where that is really coming together well, I would point to Dauphin Island who generated effective strategic and comprehensive plans and have since been taking physical actions along with updating zoning and ordinances to reflect changing conditions, needs, and pressures as laid out in that comprehensive plan.
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Dr. Tina Miller-WayThank you all for watching presentations in this session. If you watch these presentations after the conclusion of the session, you can still ask questions via the Q&A box. Your question will be sent to the speaker via email.
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Dr. Tina Miller-WayThanks to all of our speakers for their contributions today. There are positive and promising things happening in our region.
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Ms. Liz Smith-IncerThank you for moderating and guiding all of us Tina! Fun connecting with everyone on this platform. Be well friends of the Bays & Bayous!
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Deborah January-BeversThank you! So much helpful information in this symposium.
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Dr. Tina Miller-WayThank you for your presentation, Greg. Please use the Q&A box drop down menu to send any questions about this project to Greg.
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Renee ColliniHi Tina - my question is still under review, sometimes the questions are getting "stuck" until a moderator refreshes.
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Dr. Tina Miller-Way Renee - I am not seeing any unapproved questions. I did see your 2nd question to Greg a couple of minutes ago.
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Dr. Tina Miller-Way (and did approve it then).
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Renee Collini Not sure what all is going on. I had to refresh over and over again yesterday when I was moderating to get the chat and the Q&A to update.
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Dr. Tina Miller-Way I still see your question in the unanswered column, but it was approved as soon as it came in.
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Renee Collini Yeah, not sure what's up cause I have a third question that's been pending as under review for about 8 min now.
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Tara Moore SkeltonWatching your talk now, Liz! Love "seeing" you at work and not school for a change.
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Renee ColliniGreat plan, Deborah! Looking forward to following this over time!
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Dr. Tina Miller-WayJust as a reminder, you can watch these presentations in any order.
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Dr. Tina Miller-WayWe end our session with Whither Resilience? Emerging Issues in Coastal Water Law and Policy given by Greg Guthrie.
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Dr. Tina Miller-WayThank you for your presentation Deborah, I am feeling hopeful! Please use the Q&A box drop down menu to send any questions about this project to Deborah.
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Mrs. Mary Kate Brown The Q&A feature isn't working for me.
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Deborah January-Bevers If you have a question for me, you can also email me at deborah@houstonwilderness.org
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Dr. Tina Miller-Way Mary Kate, I am not sure why the Q&A is not working for you, but you may use the chat. If you are not checked in, it will not allow you to submit questions, so check to make sure you are checked into the session :-).
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Ms. Liz Smith-IncerThank you Deborah!
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Deborah January-BeversThis link also provides info on how the thousands of tons of sediments were dealt with after Hurricane Harvey - https://buffalobayou.org/one-year-later-reflecting-on-hurricane-harvey/
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Deborah January-BeversIt's a work in progress but more and more of these basins are being created.
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Mrs. Mary Kate Brown Are most of these basins built on public floodplains or are some on private?
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Mrs. Mary Kate BrownGreat diversity of the marsh basins!
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Ms. Liz Smith-IncerBeautiful engineered marsh!
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Dr. Tina Miller-WayDeborah, those are some pretty stunning pictures of the rise of water!
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Renee Collini Agreed! Very impactful!
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Dr. Karen BarefordWonderful presentation Liz. Thank you!
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